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Revolutionize the way we watch TV

Written by Luke Burgess
Posted November 25, 2005

Yesterday as my father, brother, and I watched the Broncos spoiled Thanksgiving for the Cowboys, my dad asked me about something I told you about two weeks ago. IPTV.

He wanted to know what everyone else wants to know: What's the play?

Well I've found a tiny $4 Internet Protocol pure play that specializes on IPTV.

Now I wasn't going to talk about this company for another few weeks. But I email inbox was slammed with emails asking about IPTV.

So I decided to come out with the company in Monday's issue of Archimedes' Lever. If you haven't signed up for Archimedes Lever you can sign up by clicking here.

Now if you can't recall the specifics about IPTV, let me jog your memory.

IPTV is very similar to VoIP. Except that instead of transmitting a voice signal over the internet, IPTV broadcasts audio and visual signals.

IPTV is basically a system where digital television is delivered to subscribing customers over a broadband connection.

And it will revolutionize the way we watch TV.

Every television program, movie, and advertisement will have hyperlinks that connect to the internet for more information. And while your surfing your IPTV, you'll being able to send and receive email or text messages to friends and family. You'll never have to leave the couch again.

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I Want My IPTV

So will everyone else.

IPTV is expected to grow exponentially in the coming years as broadband is now available to more than 100 million households worldwide.

Market professionals say that by the year 2007 there will be more than 200 million digital TV homes subscribers with 25% global market penetration.

Worldwide subscribers to cable video on demand services will increase from about 5 million at the end of 2003, to almost 14 million in 2007.

Broadband penetration in the United States and Europe will grow from 25 million in 2002 to 290 million in 2008.

It is predicted in less that 5 years, 72 million homes worldwide will subscribe to IPTV services.

What does this boil down to? Profit. Massive profit.

IPTV is rapidly emerging and will available to you in just a few years if not sooner.

For those businesses implementing IPTV it will provide a means of deploying interactive content and meetings unlike anything previously available on such a large scale.

For the consumer it will provide an interactive experience unlike anything they have known as the technology evolves and becomes wide-spread.

And for the investor it will offer a new technology to exploit.

Now if want to learn more about the $4 IP pure play I was talking about earlier, all you have to do is sign up for Archimedes' Lever. It's free folks. All it takes is entering your email and on Monday you'll get the complete lowdown.

If you'd like to know the name of this company and begin receiving your free weekly issues of Archimedes' Lever, simply click here.

This far into the 21st century, there isn't much left that should really surprise you as far as technology goes. We've seen initial steps in advances that will make the world look like the USS Enterprise by the time 2100 rolls around. I'm talking holographic secretaries, cars that hover like helicopters, and much creepier innovations like human cloning.

The key to this emerging technology is its size. The computers of the Cold War era went from room-size to desk-size to laptops, and now handheld units. Each progressively smaller world of gadgets requires a more compact source of power to enable performance.

There are several companies vying to be the next generation's power provider, with battery technology that will eliminate dry cell waste and the notion of recharging while your device is incapacitated. The material these batteries use has already been known to chemists and consumers for decades, but as we know it takes new ideas to make something novel from something worn.

The U.S. Department of Defense wants troops to use this technology in the field, and countless gadgets (GPS, the Internet, etc.) have remained in our national security domain until finally being unleashed on a ravenous consumer market.

It's just been approved for use on commercial airliners, meaning that soon it will be powering the laptops of countless business travelers.

Keep your eyes on Wealth Daily for more news on the power pack that will send the Energizer Bunny drumming off a cliff.

Well I'm going to get back to my turkey leftovers. I hope to talk with you then.


- Luke Burgess

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