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Heads Up: 5G Stocks Are About to Take Off

Written by Jason Stutman
Posted June 1, 2018 at 8:00PM

Some of my earliest memories in life involve spending Saturdays at my father’s office in Queens, NY.

My parents divorced early, and my father worked weekends, so much of my adolescence was spent finding things to do at the family-owned business.

More often than not this meant helping Dad out with various administrative tasks and even telephone sales. People really do have a hard time saying no to the innocent-sounding 10-year-old who just cold called them...

Still, there were plenty of days when my father couldn’t find anything useful for me to do... or perhaps he just felt bad putting me to so much work. Either way, my job then was pretty much to keep out of the way and entertain myself the best I could.

Now, I wasn’t allowed, or frankly even inclined, to roam around the streets of Jamaica on my own. Schools didn’t give homework on the weekends back then, either, so this mostly meant diddling on a vacant HP computer until it was time to leave.

It was boring for a while, but not for very long.

I can still remember the first day we got hooked up to AOL, or America Online. The birth of the internet was a saving grace for me in the fifth grade, as it opened my world up from a never-ending cycle of pinball and solitaire to chat clients and the World Wide Web.

Thanks to AOL, I could stay in touch with my friends from back home. I could play new games and read the news. I could even “Ask Jeeves” any question that came to my mind.

Looking back, it’s crazy to think about just how grateful I was for dial-up internet 20 years ago. I had no idea how it worked, but it didn’t really seem to matter back then. This magic new invention was an absolute godsend, and I couldn’t imagine anything better.

By my teenage years, though, my outlook had completely changed. By this time, dial-up was no longer a weekend novelty and perk. It was already a daily essential, yet one that wasn’t holding up very well to the passage of time.

By then, all the cool kids at school already had cable, the speeds of which blew dial-up out of the water. You could download music and videos and even load images in a couple of seconds!

This technology, which I didn’t even know existed a few years ago... well, I just HAD to have it.

So I pleaded and fussed like every kid knows how to do. I gave Mom the guilt trip until we were hooked up to “Optimum Online.” It was about four times the price of dial-up, but my teenage brain thought, “Screw it. I’m not paying the bill.”

Of course, Mom footing the bill was only temporary, but the growing need for better connectivity wasn’t. Soon enough, I needed a mobile 2G plan with talk and text. By the time college hit, a smartphone with a 3G data plan was near necessary. Today, it has to be 4G LTE for mobile and at least 100 Mbps at home.

Now, the years might not match up depending on our age difference, but I’m sure the general story sounds at least somewhat familiar. Where you used to say, “I don’t need that,” you’re now saying, “I gotta have it.”

The funny thing is that with each new advancement in connectivity, we can rarely think of a reason for anything better until those things become available to us. That’s because associated technology advances in a sort of feedback loop, where new devices and services demand faster speeds and, in turn, those faster speeds open the floodgates by enabling more devices and services.

It’s really your classic chicken-or-egg scenario, but the truth is it doesn’t matter which came first. What actually matters is what you’ll be eating tomorrow for breakfast and dinner.

Right now, our metaphorical chicken is laying yet another metaphorical egg. As you may have already guessed, that egg represents 5G, the fifth generation of mobile connectivity.

5G will be faster and stronger than all the networks that came before it combined, with speeds up to 1,000 times faster than 4G networks. As a matter of fact, 5G will be so fast, it will even compete with residential broadband and the likes of cable giants like Comcast and Cox.

You might be thinking there’s no need for such speeds — after all, you can already stream HD video — but remember that we’ve been here before.

You see, 5G is being built to support a host of new devices and services, including the Internet of Things, driverless cars, and augmented and virtual reality (all of which require the transfer of vast amounts of data). We don’t have the infrastructure in place just yet to fully realize the potential of these emerging industries, but 5G is about to change everything.

The same way dial-up launched the World Wide Web, 5G is going to launch a network of autonomous vehicles that talk to each other and the roads they drive on.

The same way 3G and 4G launched the age of the smartphone, 5G is going to launch the age of smartglasses.

Those advancements will come with time, but the infrastructure is already being put in place. For investors, that means the time to take action is right now.

As I’m sure you can imagine, the rollout of 5G is creating a wealth of opportunities in the tech sector, which is exactly why I’ve pinned down the stocks best positioned to shoot upward as a result of this new tech.

We’re putting the final touches on a free video presentation to give you the details, but due to timing and popular demand, we’ve released a written transcript early. If you’re looking to invest in the coming 5G deployment, this is the perfect place to start.

Until next time,

  JS Sig

Jason Stutman

follow basic @JasonStutman on Twitter

Jason Stutman is Wealth Daily's senior technology analyst and editor of investment advisory newsletters Technology and Opportunity and The Cutting Edge. His strategy for building winning portfolios is simple: Buy the disruptor, sell the disrupted.

Covering the broad sector of technology and occasionally dabbling in the political sphere, Jason has written hundreds of articles spanning topics from consumer electronics and development stage biotechnology to political forecasting and social commentary.

Outside the office Jason is a lover of science fiction and the outdoors, and an amateur squash player at best. He writes through the lens of a futurist, free market advocate, and fiscal conservative. Jason currently hails from Baltimore, Maryland, with roots in the great state of New York.

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